Friday, 16 November 2012

Leaving

10 comments:

  1. I can't beleaf there are so many of them. The leaf I can do is to say Merci. Though a mere thanks leafs a lot to be desired. But it's a releaf that you will not ask for more.

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  2. Fallen and leaving us, their task complete. Beautiful little wonders of photosynthetic chemistry every one. Every leaf is astonishing.

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  3. They are beautiful and I have the pleasure of walking past so many of them each morning on my journey from the car park to my office building.

    No cameras allowed which is perhaps just as well, with so many photo opportunities I would probably not make it work on time ;-)

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  4. In my (not that long ago youth), I used to collect many maple leaves and spread them, one by one, to savour each uniqueness. I also would dry them, and send them to my European penpals with my Christmas cards, thinking then naively that none had ever seen a Canadian maple tree.

    Sorry for my puns. It's Jams'fault! He got me going. I'm very good at puns. Even if, here, I have to say so myself!

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  5. Claude: You sound a bit like me in that when I was a boy I thought thistles only grew in Scotland.

    Syncy: Thanks, glad you like it. It is always hard to beat (or even match) what nature makes without thinking about it (at least I presume nature doesn't think about it but perhaps I misunderstand)

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  6. It's the interpretation that counts, no?

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  7. I agree Syncy, but then I get myself tangled in knots when I ponder that our interpretation of such things is itself the product of what nature, within us, makes without thinking... that is, nature makes us think without itself thinking... or does it? Then I just decide to look at the nice leaves again and stop thinking about them so much :)

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